5th Class have been busy!

5th Class have been busy!

Fabric and Fibre Project

We have been leaning to sew in 5th Class! We are sewing scenes inspired by the poem Leisure– what is this world if full of care, we have no time to stand and stare. However before we started that, we practiced sewing with embroidery thread on small pieces of fabric. You can have a look at them outside the classroom (; Once we all got used to sewing and practiced it, we read the poem Leisure. Next, we chose a line in the poem and that’s what we are sewing! We haven’t finished yet but when they are- feel free to have a look!

Planting in our Vegeatable Garden

As you all know, Paddy Maden visited our school last week. Paddy very kindly demonstrated how to plant peas! Mmm, sounds tasty! Mya’s dad very kindly donated some cabbage and lettuce plants and we had a lot of fun this week planting in our garden. We’re looking forward to enjoying some of our delicious veg!!

Madagascar

In 5th Class we have been learning about Madagascar. Madagascar is the largest island in Africa and it’s off the east coast.

We have learned about lots of different things like the history, how they broke away from France, the plants & animals- and lots more!

We made posters about native animals in Madagascar

Sikhism

In 5th Class we have also been learning about Sikhism. Sikhism is the world’s youngest major religion as it was founded 500 years ago. In spite of that- it has over 200 million followers! It isn’t from any other religion- for example Christianity and Jewism both follow the same book. It was founded by Guru Nanak.

Some of the Sikh’s main beliefs include:

  • Everyone is equal
  • There is 1 god
  • Men and women are equal
  • To meditate

We also learned about some of their ceremony and made posters.   

All content in the 5th class review has been created by Laoise!

The National Children’s Choir

The National Children’s Choir

Together we sung 15 songs including Starman, O Fortuna, Kusimama and Listen to the Rain.

The concert was conducted by Mairéad Déiseach. The presenter was Shane Morgan. He introduced every song and performed two songs himself. They were called A Million Dreams and An Elvis Presley medley.

The concert was around 1 hour and 45 minutes. It was a fun night at the end of it all and a great experience. We would recommend it! It was a lot of practicing but it was worth it in the end.  By Ruairi and Max (5th class)

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[/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]There were 5 other schools singing on the same night as RETNS with a total of 490 children performing. Together we sung 15 songs including Starman, O Fortuna, Kusimama and Listen to the Rain.

The concert was conducted by Mairéad Déiseach. The presenter was Shane Morgan. He introduced every song and performed two songs himself. They were called A Million Dreams and An Elvis Presley medley.

The concert was around 1 hour and 45 minutes. It was a fun night at the end of it all and a great experience. We would recommend it! It was a lot of practicing but it was worth it in the end.  By Ruairi and Max (5th class)

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Last week, 5th and 6th class did the National Children’s Choir on Tuesday night. There were 5 other schools singing on the same night as RETNS with a total of 490 children performing. Together we sung 15 songs including Starman, O Fortuna, Kusimama and Listen to the Rain.

The concert was conducted by Mairéad Déiseach. The presenter was Shane Morgan. He introduced every song and performed two songs himself. They were called A Million Dreams and An Elvis Presley medley.

The concert was around 1 hour and 45 minutes. It was a fun night at the end of it all and a great experience. We would recommend it! It was a lot of practicing but it was worth it in the end.  By Ruairi and Max (5th class)

Drumming workshops with Brian

Drumming workshops with Brian

Drumming Workshops with Brian

2nd Class were the lucky kids to have a wonderful drumming workshop with Brian. Brian has borrowed a set of drums from Blackrock Education Centre. We don’t just have talented children, members of our staff have many talents too, and Brian is an accomplished drummer. All children from 2nd to 6th class will benefit from his talent and expertise as he holds drumming workshops with each class.

LEAVE NO TRACE WORKSHOP by 5th Class

LEAVE NO TRACE WORKSHOP by 5th Class

On the 24th and the 25th of January 2018 5th and 6th did a “Leave No Trace” workshop, about the environment. A man called Padraig came into us from the “Leave No Trace” company.

We learned a lot about nature and animals and how to stop litter and waste. We learned about this by playing games like the ‘A-Z of nature’ game, doing a scavenger hunt and the ‘Food Chain’ game.

We also did a quiz on litter and how long it takes to decompose. For example we learned from the quiz that a glass bottle will never decompose, a crisp packet will take 80 years to decompose and a nappy will take 450 years to decompose! A baby will use up to 6000 nappies on average so that means your nappies are still somewhere in a landfill.

We learned in our quiz that the only living animal that begins with the letter X is the X-ray fish! We found out that there is a floating rubbish pile in the Pacific Ocean the size of Texas! No one really knows what to do with it because it’s so big it would be nearly impossible to move.

We learned that the Rowan tree very rarely gets struck by lightning due to how small it is and its tendency to grow beside other, taller trees. There was a myth made up about it and its connections with Thor, an ancient god.

We also learned about how everyone enjoys different parts of nature, and how if even one species of animal went extinct, everything could. We found out from the food chain game, that the sun is the most powerful thing in the universe and when, say for example, all the  of crows die that whatever hunts crows will eventually die and so on and so on.    

This workshop was very fun and we would like to thank Padraig for giving up his time for a whole two days to teach us about leaving no trace.

By Lucy Bracken and Eve O’Callaghan from 5th class

Kilmainham Gaol Visit by 5th Class

Kilmainham Gaol Visit by 5th Class

On the sixth of February, fifth class went on a class trip to Kilmainham Gaol. This is the jail which opened in 1796 as a new jail in County Dublin, and closed its doors in 1924. The 1916 rising leaders were also executed here, and spent their last nights in some of the cells.

We came here to go on a tour with a girl called Siobhán, and she showed us around the jail. The walls were all crinkled and vandalised, by now it is very, very old. Written here, are some interesting facts about the jail itself.

People used to be kept in over-crowded cells, sometimes with up to fifty people. They were treated very badly until the guards and people working in the jail figured out that the criminals were trading tricks of the trade, and were coming out with even more criminal ideas and ways not to get caught. A man brought this to court so that the jail made individual cells for the people staying there. Then, they would be isolated and not want to come back, so they would be better people and wouldn’t need to come back.

Children as young as five were taken into the jail for small things, such as stealing bread or milk. When they turned eighteen, they would move into the adult cells and exercise yards.

The exercise yards were where men and women were broken into two groups, and tied together. Both groups would walk around in a circle, following each other’s feet with their heads looking down at the ground. If they looked up, or talked to one another, they would get smacked with whips by the guards.

After the prisoners came back to their cells, they would only be left with a plank of wood to sleep on and a thin blanket. They also had a bucket (which they cleaned out themselves every morning) to do their business in (you know what I mean).

Leaders from the 1916 Rising had these same facilities, and were all kept in cells in the same corridor. The oldest of them was fifty nine years old, and the youngest was Pádraig Pearse’s younger brother, who was also executed. One of them was Joseph Plunkett, who was married to his wife, Grace before he was executed.

When Joseph was condemned to death, his soon-to-be wife was allowed to marry him some hours before he was executed. The couple were only allowed to say their vows, and other than that, did not get to speak to each other. It was in the chapel, which had been filled with British soldiers and guards. This chapel was also the first place that we visited. A couple of hours after the wedding, the pair were allowed to have ten minutes to speak to each other in Joseph’s cell, but could not speak as they were reduced to only tears. After he was executed, Grace never re-married, and lived a lonely life.

Thomas Clarke was also executed, but was shot in the arm and leg before the execution, and he was too weak to make it to the other side of the exercise yard. He was carried to the end of the yard strapped to a chair and lifted by guards. He was given a blindfold to wear and was shot.

Inside the jail, next we saw the biggest cell block, which was designed so that the guards could easily see any of the cells from the middle angle. They had a clever pulley system to get the food around to the different cells in a quick and efficient way.

Lastly, we went to the museum which had lots of information and prisoners’ last letters. Overall, this trip to Kilmainham Gaol was probably the best we have been on, and we learnt lots.

Typed and written by Rebecca and Maia in fifth class.